Marsha Rozenblit

Marsha Rozenblit
Harvey M. Meyerhoff Professor of Modern Jewish History
University of Maryland

Marsha L. Rozenblit is the Harvey M. Meyerhoff Professor of Modern Jewish History at the University of Maryland, College Park, where she has been on the faculty since 1978. A social historian of the Jews of Central Europe, she is the author of two books: The Jews of Vienna, 1867-1914: Assimilation and Identity (State University of New York Press, 1983) and Reconstructing a National Identity: The Jews of Habsburg Austria during World War I (Oxford University Press, 2001). She has co-edited two collections of essays: Constructing Nationalities in East Central Europe (with Pieter Judson, Berghahn Books, 2005) and World War I and the Jews: Conflict and Transformation in Europe, The Middle East, and America (with Jonathan Karp, Berghahn Books, 2017), and she has written over 30 scholarly articles on the Jews of the Habsburg Monarchy and its successor states. These articles deal with such issues as Jewish marriage and courtship practices in 1920s Vienna, German-Jewish schools in Moravia, and the social foundations of antisemitism in the Habsburg Monarchy.

She served as the Vice President for Program of the Association for Jewish Studies from 2007-2009 and president of the AJS from 2009-2011. She also served as treasurer of the AAJR from 2008-2018.

 

Selected Publications

The Jews of Vienna, 1867-1914: Assimilation and Identity (State University of New York Press, 1983)

Reconstructing a National Identity: The Jews of Habsburg Austria during World War I (Oxford University Press, 2001)

“Jews, German Culture, and the Dilemma of National Identity: The Case of Moravia, 1848-1938,” Jewish Social Studies, n.s. 20, #1 (Fall 2013): 77-120.

“Creating Jewish Space: German-Jewish Schools in Moravia,” Austrian History Yearbook 44 (2013): 108-147.

“The Struggle over Religious Reform in Nineteenth-Century Vienna,” AJS [Association for Jewish Studies] Review 14, #2 (1989), pp. 179-221.

“Choosing a Synagogue: The Social Composition of Two German Congregations in Nineteenth-Century Baltimore,” The American Synagogue: A Sanctuary Transformed, edited by Jack Wertheimer (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987), pp. 327-362.